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their christian religion, others followed their muslim religion, and others their african superstitions. for me, this went to the heart of why the book was inevitable, or why, for me, i was engaged this this discourse all my life. it's very strange. i found it very interesting today, close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which for admitting what i believe or for believing what i do not believe to be considered of what i call terminal censorship. now, go back to the history, and i don't mean just me personally. i'm talking about the society in which i live, in which i was raised, the history of my people as i now write in the book, when the european explorers, of course, always quickly followed by religious storm troopers, the missionaries came to africa on the mission of conversion, they had a very serious problem, and that was they could not find satan. they couldn't find the denver. now, if you want to convert people, you have to persuade them that they -- that their soul is in dire danger, that they are headed for the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. from
talk about religion. been division and the religious order discussed at the time of the founding and how is that been according to your account, simplified in use by the right-wing? >> guest: it depends on the u.s.. they were founding fathers who are very religious. there were founders who believed that this was going to be a christian nation and that we needed the inspiration of god in the bible in our politics. i think patrick henry is a good example of a very religious founding father, and that was one of the -- one of the positions of the founding era. there were founding fathers who were not christian. the word deists are unitarians. there were some who were deist or unitarian who believe that religion was sort of a good way to control the masses. they didn't particularly care much for church and they thought it was a nice thing, and they perhaps george washington and john adams fell in to that category. they expressed a lot of religious doubts but did not really try to slow it down in the public sphere. and then there's jefferson and madison, who went through a very lengthy
that government may not substantially burden the free exercise of religion without it extremely wait of public interest. and i defend those ideas. the second prong of my approach is for consistency and a self examination in our approach to the religion of other people. many policies lack the basic virtue to have a coherent and consistent policy across similar cases. many are flawed in a deeper way people act in ways to give there group special privileges. so we will see that but the third prong i argue even with good principles and consisting reasoning we still need something more. active, a curious imagination learned about the lives of others and coming to see how the world looks from other points of view i give works of literature from both adults come to children to promote the a understanding. i use the history of prejudice as a historical case that is good to think about. for the 19th century antisemitism it has the unfortunate features and the obvious wrongness may guide us as we think of issues that are too close to be seen with a clarity deserved. but now with second prong and princip
protection to religion in the u.s. constitution. this interview part of booktv's college series was recorded at the university of pennsylvania will -- pennsylvania. it's about 20 minutes. >> university of pennsylvania professor sarah gordon, "the spirit of the law" is her most recent book. what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and the new constitutional world when it comes to religion? >> guest: well, for most of her nation's history with the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organization and so on, and in the early decades of the 20 century that began to shift. the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and exercise clauses of the first amendment against the state, sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states for control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did indeed that the first amendment began, congress shall i not know love so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were ther
and animosity with the wars of religion but also colonial religious domination by europeans and added to that anti-catholicism that implicated not only germany but other nations as well year in the u.s. like to think those times are in the past and religious violence was somewhere else and characterized by christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. searching for critical self examination as we have the ear and suspicion to disfigure all democracy. april 2011 in france it is illegal to cover the face from parks to the marketplace of local law does not mention the word winded, and muslim or fail or burqa but it was a band on veiling but it did threatens french values of dignity and equality. although france is a good country to put the ban on the burqa in public space but it is being considered all over europe in many have adopted restrictions. april 28, 2011 belgium voted for a similar ban although it is expected to be challenged. spain 2010 the catalonia and assembly nearly rejected the ban on the burqa reid -- reversing an earlier vote. similar votes are in progress
] but i wanted to ask you specific the congo where is the role of religion? worries the role of religion can turn into role of women in society, the standing of women and public officials and how do you square that connection with regard to a generational issue? i would like to help to clarify something although i haven't been -- and this just in a meeting. the meeting took place the majority of the time amongst the various groups in syria and the facilitating states really kept outside. i am painfully aware of the point you raised in an addition if i can say comes through much am i. but i have to be honest, in a situation where we have continuing destruction and we are running neck and a time factor, and even discerning the change of the winter coming into syria. do you grasp any straw you can get to bring about peace. but it can, that does not excuse that there are not more women involved. so my question concerns the role of women and religion. >> rate, thank you very much. a second one and then i'll try. >> thoughts or stories. >> on the second year at the woodrow wilson school, one o
of the 20th century. he did not in the end adopt some foreign religion. he adopted his own religion, that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamist convert to what is to them a foreign religion, but rather an islam of their own ancestors, one and poisoned by the extremism we associate with wahhabism and al qaeda. the problem for us is that christianity was very much part of western culture and something that we were knowledgeable about and suited to fight over. islam is different. is hard for our government to be effective with the struggle of that religion. i just want to also note by the way ,-com,-com ma because charlie mentioned an awful, the journey. "witness" was one of the greatest autobiographical groups on extremism. perhaps one of the greatest novels about it. and they had great political impacts in part because they were great literary works, works of art. there are some islamic works about breaking with extremism. the islamist by ed hussein, radical i -- but i don't think there are any such works that are great works of art scene from the point
religion you are, what economic class you're in, what your gender is or theoretically, at least, what your sexual orientation is. at least that's the way it's supposed to be. certainly, most libertarians already get that, and i think that why they have a sp
and religion" i just want to say a few words of the subject matter to be discussed today were the of what became a years of endeavor and peter bergen will be your host and moderator today. catherine unfortunately is not here to the -- today but is a:editor about the taliban and its environment southern afghanistan, and western pakistan. to get at them itself when the united states was puzzling over its resurgence in afghanistan as a military challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 arab emirates that it presented itself as a grave dilemma to the obamacare administration so we try to provide the regularity about this phenomenon recognizing the cliche image of the of one i aid malaya and his band of fanatics was inaccurate and falsified the problem. said not to prosecute a particular view of the taliban but look at its diversity and aspects of the character fetter not part of american debate to. i am really proud of this book and peter whose leadership from new america has been a joy in my office to support him and watch him. the last thing i want to talk -- that i want
or other with the issue of religion in human life, in politics, and in social life. this is including a book on the difficulty journalists frequently have in properly understanding religion as a motive in events, and the book, itself, is called "blind spot" don't together with roberta, and my colleague, who is here today, paul marshall, published by oxford press and won several literary prizes. it's also included work on a book entitled a table in the presence which was written by lieutenant commander kerry cash which concerns his experiences as a chaplain in combat in iraq. another portion of her work, also within the general area of religion, has focused on the fate of christians around the world, and in particular, their prevails in recent years. this included the award winning "their blood cries out," also co-authoredded with paul marshall, and "eyewitness to a broken world," and cox is a distinguished member of the house of lords, famous as a campaigner for human rights and for christian rights. there will also be out fairly soon another book called "persecuted: the global assaul
finding some kind of religion is way for solace and community building in the prisons s. so there, you know, there's sometimes a lot of kind of good community building that comes with that, and that's why the aclu's actually been -- has litigated to protect the religious rights of prisonerses access to places to worship and things like that because there's actually a lot of good that can come from people finding that kind of community. one more question? >> hi. i heard that aclu mostly helps people that are in prison. what about people that have been through the prison experience and perhaps witnessed police misconduct and tampering with evidence, things of that nature? what, you know, what could be done? i know there's postconviction release, and there's the other thing where they take the charges off like that, i forget what it's called, but, um -- >> yes. we do a lot of work on prison reform -- police reform. our affiliates especially work on excessive use of force cases, we work on racial profiling matters. we kind of run the gamut on police misconduct and police reform. we are som
.s. -- religious freedom. the role of religion and the narratives that the afghan taliban offering the pakistani taliban offer often couched in militant terms, does that play with the populations of taliban -- talibanistan and something that brings something closer to them or is it just political verbiage with a different addressing? >> answers have to be like 30 seconds please. sorry. we have got to wrap it up. >> in the case of police, the reason there was not investment and police in pakistan is because of sheer incompetence. of course that leads to lack of political will. i will also criticize the government as well as the pakistan government. in 2001 to 2008 the u.s. started looking at the police is an important institution. but why from 2001 to 2000 adobe's departments and organizations in the u.s. never talked about counterterrorism as a civil law issue. >> a good point. >> there are elements of the taliban who believe this is the right time to negotiate because they don't think that the '90s taliban will be reconstituted. there are others who disagree with that, but that is essentially w
caller. >> caller: it's deplorable that republicans always find their religion when measures are needed that doesn't affect areas of their concern. i didn't see anybody asking for offsets when, and the federal debt and deficit was blooming with george bush, and nobody wanted offsets to help those in the disaster relief all the way up until this president got in office. he came in with a federal debt and deficit already ballooned, but everybody found religion on spending after george bush hut the wars on the credit card and the medicare part d on the credit card. it was under already, and now they found religion and cut all programs that affect people that didn't cause the downturn or didn't cause the ballooning of the debt so they find religion when it doesn't affect them. >> guest: the club for growth had a consistent position on this. we are akooked of being uncaring when it comes time to disaster relief, and it's an up fair accusation because we want people to get help that they need, but we think it ought to be paid for and not to put the burden or spread the burden larger. it shoul
any religion, my grandfather would recite the declaration of independence, the preamble and the gettysburg address to his kids and we came to believe those things as the most important thing, believed in the principles of the united states, justice and the rule of law. i believed what ronald reagan said. much more than welfare or power, values are the greatest strength in the world. i do believe morris davis and andy worthington said, they matter when they are tested, you got to do it and i also believe, i might screwed up, dante's saying that the worst places in hell are reserved for those who stand silent in the case of injustice. [applause] >> open it up to questions if you could identify yourself and ask a question and wait for the microphone. >> you spoke a little bit about roadblocks from congress. can anyone in the panel talk about specific ones that were just renewed or past and what impact that will have? >> we were talking before we came in. this is becoming a new year's eve tradition. congress passes the national defense authorization act, the last couple year
. there is some economic fate that he basically made up his own religion and wrote this really weird book called something like this secret history of the universe as revealed through a cult science in the troy, michigan, which i almost used for my title. [laughter] so just to tell the story very quickly, he and his entire family were brutally, gruesomely murdered. they were beheaded and his children were killed as well and it was this big sensational story at the time. you can go through the free press archives and plan on this coverage. and it was never solved. at a certain point i realized it was not far from where i was living over in eastern market. so what to check it out for his house was is just a field now. i just kind of filed it away. weirdly enough, probably a year later, there was another murder, almost literally across the street. it was the drug thing and these kids were trying to scare -- two rival drug houses in this zone and these two teenagers were trying to scare off their rivals and so to do this, i ended up killing them horribly dismembering this guy come in the this random
the issue between franco and the vatican which made every other religion illegal -- i begin that chapter with a funny story, really. it was funny -- it's not funny. i'm in a bar up in northern spain, and the guy's in the bar are -- the guys in the bar are trying to teach me how to pour the wonderful hard cider, which perhaps you know it, you know, and you hold -- yeah, right, now hold the bottle this way over your head, and you have a glass with a very big open glass pointing out this way, and the cider's supposed to come down, hit the outside of the glass and bounce in. i'm trying to do that, but most is running all over my pants and the floor. a little bit is going into the glass, and one of the guys says to me, and we're all pretty well drunk by this time, and the guy says to me, "are you catholic or atheist?" those were the -- those seemed to be the only possibilities. i said, no, no, i'm neither a catholic nor an atheist. no kidding. you must be protestant. why do you think that? everybody in the american government is protestant. well, no, that's not true either. john kennedy was n
your language and your religion, we will do it. but at the same time we're going to insist on our own identity as a mandate people. so you could say that there after the identity grew as a counterpoint to this idea that they should be, civilized highest christians. now, all of these tensions were on display because once the supreme court ruled in their favor, and said they could go home, well, the supreme court also ruled the united states government had no responsibility to pay for their going home so how were they going to get home? well, ma for the longest time people believed that some wealthy abolitionists would pay for this, but, in fact, what happened was the abolitionists with the cooperation of the amistad africans organize a big tour up and down the eastern seaboard in which the amistad africans would go and speak and perform, perform their knowledge of christianity, performed their knowledge of english, performed their civilization. and at the same time, they would insist on singing their native african songs. the african side was always there. and here's the wildest part o
, i think for a lot of people in prison, finding some kind of religion is a way for solace and for community building in the prisons, and so there, you know, there is -- there's sometimes a lot of kind of good community building that comes with that, and that's why the aclu's litigated to protect the religious rights of prisoners, religious access, access to places to worship and things like that because there's actually a lot of good that can come from people finding that kind of community. one more question? >> i heard that aclu, housing people in prison, but what about people who have been through the prison, and, perhaps it's witnessing conduct, and what's, you know, what is the goal? there's conviction to read, and there's the other thing with the charge, and -- >> we do a lot of work on police reform. affiliates, especially, work on excessive use of force cases. they work on racial profiling matters. we run the gamet on police reform. we are sometimes working collaboration with police departments to reform their policies and practices and training, and so we do a lot
of people in prison, finding some kind of religion is a way for solace and for community building in the prison. but so, there is, there's something a lot of kind of good community building that comes with that, that's why the aclu has actually been, has litigated to protect the religious rights of christians, access to places to worship and things like that, because there's actually a lot of good that can come from people find that kind of community. >> one more question. >> i heard that aclu wodehouse people veteran prison. what about people who have been through prison -- with police misconduct or whatever it is. you know, what could be done? [inaudible] the other thing where they take the charges off. i forget what it's called. >> yes. we do a lot of work on police reform. our affiliates especially work on excessive and abusive force cases. they do work on racial profiling matters. we kind of run the gamut on police misconduct and police reforms. we are sometimes working in collaboration with police departments to reform their policies and practices and training. and so we do
and the freedom of religion. he is very much showing at this point why he is different and why his thinking is different and why rhode island is different from massachusetts, and the other colonies to the north. he was creating a land where people could come, could worship as they chose, and would always be protected by the civil law. roger williams, while he was a member of the clergy, was also incredible trained and learned in civil law and actually worked for circle in the british parliament. and we see a lot of his ideas of civil law in preparation of church and state. articulated in text like this but this did not of course sit well with england or with massachusetts. by an actor british parliament, all of the copies of this book were set to be burned. likely not all of them were. this copy was not an we're able to show that the people today. this didn't go unnoticed by people here in the colony. this next book has a contemporary binding, was a response to "the bloody tenent." the response, "the bloody tenent" made white in the blood of the land is response high cotton. it comes just a
and his three brothers came to the united states. my grandfather, more than any religion, my grandfather would recite the declaration of independence of the preamble of the gettysburg address. we have injustice and the rule of law. and you know, i believe what ronald reagan said. our values are our greatest strength in the world. and i do believe what was said, it matters when you are tested and you have to do it. thank you. >> we would like to open it up for questions. >> could you talk about the impact it will have? >> this is becoming a new year's eve tradition. if anyone is being transferred out of guantÁnamo, they have to be given a certification and the reasons for the transfer out have to be noted. on new year's eve, it becomes which will draw first. the ball in times square or obama? there is another key word i would use to describe what has been done. all the right things have been said about the rule of law and principles and values. but he has failed to live up to his words. but a lot of the critics are the ones that say that president bush and anyone who decides to interfere
or different traits, a different religion or want to protect statices house on courts, i believe few have become the watch for the notion that this intersection of the theory basically says that somebody can be different who has multiple traits as opposed to just one of them and the law should take that into account. do you have an opinion on that? >> i suppose we are talking about mixed motives? >> it's sort of like that, but just opposed to an african-american male how they might have a different experience because of the streets together. >> but if the differential experience is reflected in the paycheck, and the objective qualifications and performance are the same, then of course it can't be a double recovery but the plant should recover. i think that is part of the civil-rights restoration act of 91. congress had the principle that the mixed motives causation is subject to atcausation is subject to attack under the law of title seven. >> could you tell us a little bit about what led you to make the decision to go to law school and corresponding do you have any advice for the student
, tried or religion but by conscious choice. our choices are defined by constitution and values of a tolerant culture, democratic society and a market-driven economy. in shaping the international environment for space activities, the estate should she -- seek to build the most prosperous world in which our values are taken be on earth. in doing so we should also exercise some humility and face of the unknown. did thomas jefferson know the ultimate economic return or impact of the investment into the investment into we see in the purchase and the lewis and clark expedition? the teddy roosevelt in building the panama canal? did kennedy with apollo? in their time these projects were controversial and criticize in congress, but who today would say it should not have been done. we see these efforts define us as a nation, a nation that pioneers the next frontier. let me conclude by observing that we're all in this together. the white house, congress and u.s. government agencies for international partners, space station, science station, size me, universities, research center. many u.s
-founded -- in the future come up based on a protected category, rape, religion, nationality, political opinion or membership in a particular social group. the siv program traditionally, special immigrant visa, usually based on service with the united states. this is something mr. bartlett is a little bit more of an expert on, but congress legislated a program, special immigrant visas, to say that those who have worked for the united states government, there are three subcategories within a special immigrant visa program. initially it was small, a translator with the military but it expanded beyond that to include industry employs. and really for them it's the fact of the service with the united states that makes them eligible. and when they come to the united states, both our agencies -- they don't come with the refugee. they come as a lawful permanent resident xo when they arrived they get a green card. based on their service. now, there are some individuals who may be eligible to apply for both programs. and have worked with the us embassy or the u.s. military so they're eligible to apply fo
% of the religion sterd voters in pennsylvania were not going to have the required form of voter i.d. on election day, and would have to vote provisionally. we found out, common law of court issued its ruling on october 2nd which was, what, five weeks before the election. coincidentally it was the first day we scheduled our photo voter i.d. training for election officials. so we went through with the process. a little difficult to train your poll workers for something that may be in effect six months from now. may be in effect a year from now. but the way the law stand right now it will probably be in effect for this coming primary. we don't know that yet. we trained about 4200 election officers out of the relatively, about 5000 that are required to attend training in pennsylvania. and, it was a success because we were able to reinforce the provisions for provisional ballot voting because as we have heard before, just relatively complicated process filling out all the paperwork. the last thing you don't want to happen is for a voter's vote not to count because an election official didn't sign off
religion and its own incompatible view of the other is going to have to put up with the other and find ways to work together and apple and google for example the compete and the newcomers appear. but they are not members of the gang of four. >> i'm not suggesting this. there are many candidates. twitter is one that has been suggested and even netflix as i mentioned and of course microsoft is absent and my calculation or they certainly wish that they were. [laughter] >> we have some very good questions from the floor that relate to some of this, so one question is all the scrutiny over the day the effect that business strategy? >> what happens with all of these companies to collect a lot of data and each of them has different rules. it's largely going to be controlled by the privacy and something called the european data protectorate which is all about what you do with the big data analytics and i think the same solution is going to say that the data is owned by the person, not by the company, or at least cannot be used without that person's permission and that the anonymous the the house to
specific the congo where is the role of religion? worries the role of religion can turn into role of women in society, the standing of women and public officials and how do you square that connection with regard to a generational issue? i would like to help to clarify something although i haven't been -- and this just in a meeting. the meeting took place the majority of the time amongst the various groups in syria and the facilitating states really kept outside. i am painfully aware of the point you raised in an addition if i can say comes through much am i. but i have to be honest, in a situation where we have continuing destruction and we are running neck and a time factor, and even discerning the change of the winter coming into syria. do you grasp any straw you can get to bring about peace. but it can, that does not excuse that there are not more women involved. so my question concerns the role of women and religion. >> rate, thank you very much. a second one and then i'll try. >> thoughts or stories. >> on the second year at the woodrow wilson school, one of the sunny women's studies
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27